Great job on the top 25 MLMs. Really like what you’re doing for the industry as a whole. Your analysis is spot on. However, a closer look at retention rates for each company might give you another perspective on the value proposition of any given company. As a Doterra Wellness Advocate we are told by our corporate execs that we have a 65% retention rate with customers repurchasing the product within 3 months. And that if we based it on the industry standard of 12 months our retention would go up to 85%. I’m told that this is unprecedented in network marketing. So I’m believing that Doterra is succeeding because its selling a product that works and that users and word-of-mouth drive the business in the long run.

(May 2017 update: did this go under?) The sign up cost will make you do a triple take (almost four figures), but you get to set your own retail price on every product you sell. If you’ve got the skills to make people cough up the cash for their products (which, btw, are pretty legit), you could definitely make that money back. They’ve also been winning plenty of awards (even a growth award from the Direct Selling Association themselves). https://5q4t430vypa2hfnfg343rud1-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/clickfunnels-review-funnel-builder.jpg
Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.

Your comment and it’s militant nature are the EXACT OPPOSITE of what I believe the doTERRA culture is founded upon. I hope anyone reading this thread choose to look past your article and it’s attack on YoungLiving when basing their decision as to which company they choose to go with. I want them to know that the manner in which you needlessly attacked them is in no way a representation of all the other reps nor the company itself.

I am considering joining a MLM but can’t decide. Almost everyone I know either does Genesis Pure, Xyngular, or Thrive. I want something that is healthy and simple. Not something you have to do 3-5 items to have great health results. Please help! There are so many choices. I have researched and read reviews, about the companies and they each have pros and cons. Suggestions please Elliot and thanks again for your time and assistance.
I will give you an example of how important trust is in regards to making a sale with an internet business. How many of those annoying spam emails that have a headline like “Prada handbag sale – from $100”. I assume that, like me, you just delete them. I bet you don’t even open them. Why not, a Prada bag for $100 is incredible value! It’s for one reason only… it’s because you don’t trust them!
First of all, Avon “has” been. Second, Avon really needs to work on their appeal to a younger generation. Third, Avon makes it difficult for representatives to make any money unless you are purchasing a ton of catalogs and knocking on doors. The company really needs to allow representatives to advertise online, and I don’t mean spamming friends on a Facebook or Twitter feed. https://cdn-evergreenprof.pressidium.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/clickfunnels-funnel.png
Apparently, he did everything he was asked, from buying monthly training products to attending conferences, which can get expensive. Today, those costs are greatly reduced. The Internet, online training, flat-rate long distance and/or cell phone service, and free and affordable online marketing have made building any business, including MLM, much more affordable. 
How MLM companies are NOT considered Pyramid organizations is beyond me! They are all scams by the very nature of their organization structure. Those who start or get in early benefit directly from the efforts of those beneath them, forever. Not to mention the fact that most product sold through any of these MLM organization’s is to the dealer network itself. The top dogs are making money regardless as long as there is new blood coming in. And the best way to keep new blood coming in is to incentivize those at the lower middle and below to continue recruiting to build “a network of their own”. And those on the verge of “breaking through” who have already invested a small fortune in products along the way that are sitting on their pantry shelves NEED to keep recruiting. The very thing that differentiates a Pyramid scheme from an MLM is that an MLM sells an actual product. That is it. It doesn’t determine who that product is sold to as it should since we know that most product is sold to the worker bees and not to the general public for long.
That's the difference. So, the real question is what stage of earnings is your business in. Does your business fall into the struggling to make a buck category? Then don't buy it and focus on getting quality clients one at a time. If you're turning a profit and looking to go from 5 to 6 figures or more. Then get your credit card out and supercharge your business.
A few people do make big money from MLMs. And these people are often trotted out in promotional videos, celebrated at annual events, and very publicly ‘rewarded’ with prizes like prestigious cars (although these ‘prizes’ aren’t as generous as they first appear – you simply get a discount on the lease which you must take out in your own name, and if your sales fall, the discount ends…). You also need to promote the company on the car they ‘give’ you. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/5b39-VT3qPQ/maxresdefault.jpg
Traffic sources. As you’ve probably noticed throughout this article, different traffic sources work better for different stages in the marketing funnel. Sometimes, however, a traffic source can surprise you, so it is a good idea to track how many people are entering your marketing funnel from each source and stage so that you can give your top sources more budget and attention.
Got it. Thanks Pete. You might like to know we’re updating our 6-Figure Funnel training right now to tailor it one version of it to product businesses, and the other version to professional service companies like your’s. We’ve also relaunched our free sales funnel checklist w/ video training. You can pop-in your email address to get that on this page.
A marketing qualified lead (MQL) is a prospective customer who has demonstrated a particular level of engagement that leads the marketing team to conclude that real sales potential exists. The level of complexity involved in this assessment will vary based on the resources available to the team. Norman, for example, might conclude that anybody who fills out his online demonstration request form is an MQL. A company that’s using a marketing automation program might be able to set the bar to MQL qualification at something involving a combination of viewing specific pages, interacting with certain forms, and opening a certain number of email messages. https://changecreator.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/null-5.png
Hi Matt, a really great article which pulls out many strengths. I’m a wedding photographer and I’m researching new ways to funnel visitors by their current; challenges, position in planning their wedding and then addressing short term buyers vs longer cycle buyers who are researching etc. Do you have any advice or examples which could be useful even if a different industry? Thanks Pete
I highly recommend you at least have one funnel in place to generate customers in your business, whether it's a service or product-based business, because it will help keep your company safe. It will help keep you safe from the FTC coming in and saying, “Look, you just have a big down line full of people that only buy the product themselves. You don't have real customers. Thus you're not a real business.”
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