With so many of the fastest growing MLM companies pushing to have you join, it can get confusing when you’re looking at MLM products, compensation plans, where to get leads, marketing tips, and most of all – can I really make money with this? What you need to remember, is that the best MLM to join in your situation is going to come down to one thing – finding a product and a business you are excited about sharing!
Once you’ve got prospective buyers on your email list, through a lead magnet or an opt-in page, now you need to present them with an inexpensive, low-ticket offer to buy your product or service. This is anything that sells for between $1-$50, which could be in the form of introductory courses, affiliate marketing, videos, free plus shipping offers, continuity programs, audio, paperback, or eBooks. 
Scentsy is a party plan MLM company offering a variety of home and personal fragrance products. These include a popular line of scented wickless candles and decorative ceramic warmers. Independent consultants sell products through home parties, fairs and shows as well as online. For just $49, you can get a starter kit with everything you need to launch your new business. After that, you can work at whatever level you want. For example, you can either just earn extra income or you can work enough to replace your income from your 9-to-5 job.
If you haven't, you aren't alone. New data from HubSpot reveals that 68% of B2B organizations have yet to identify what their sales funnel is. A lot of business owners spend too much time chasing leads, but how do you know which leads or hot or cold? You don't, unless you have a system in place for attracting, keeping, and growing your customer base.
MLMs have been made illegal in some jurisdictions as a mere variation of the traditional pyramid scheme, including in mainland China.[10][11] In jurisdictions where MLMs have not been made illegal, many illegal pyramid schemes attempt to present themselves as MLM businesses.[7] Given that the overwhelming majority of MLM participants cannot realistically make a net profit, let alone a significant net profit, but instead overwhelmingly operate at net losses, some sources have defined all MLMs as a type of pyramid scheme, even if they have not been made illegal like traditional pyramid schemes through legislative statutes.[4][19][20] https://i.ytimg.com/vi/pqT8yFqx858/maxresdefault.jpg
Customers will move on to Stage 5 when the sale is complete. Although we won’t detail it here, Norman should brainstorm the kinds of information these customers will need, as well as how he’ll provide it as part of a cohesive onboarding process. Though he doesn’t need to worry about customers finding him at this stage or moving on to the next one, it’s still important to meet their needs so that they walk away feeling good about their purchase decisions!
I absolutely love your writing style. I’m a huge sales guy and I absolutely love seeing QUALITY CONTENT out there helping people to get from where they are to where they want to be! You guys are amazing. One thing I’m not teaching is right now is marketing and let me tell you it’s not very many places many people can locate quality content helping them with marketing specifically. Keep up the good work!
I believe the ones that don’t make it in the industry (if they chose a good one) don’t give it enough time (like you said they quit before a year is up) and commitment to doing what it takes to grow. I don’t spam FB and only 2 family members order product but I have at least 100+ home school moms making >$2000/mth. Some team members make more, some less. It’s what they put into it (business wise not monetary)
Once you have each asset labeled with a stage in the buyer’s journey, start adding platforms and strategies for which that asset would be good a good fit. For example, blogs and infographics work great on social media, while case studies should be left to email marketing and PPC ads. From there, you can create your actual content distribution calendar:
Without those key facts, your marketing and sales funnel will be skewed. Excessive focus on one part of your funnel can cause problems elsewhere. If you focus only on owned media like follower numbers and email addresses, you may have trouble with conversions. Or, if you only focus on brand awareness and neglect email marketing, you’ll likely miss out on sales.
Multi-level marketing (MLM), also called pyramid selling,[1][2] network marketing,[2][3] and referral marketing,[4] is a marketing strategy for the sale of products or services where the revenue of the MLM company is derived from a non-salaried workforce selling the company's products/services, while the earnings of the participants are derived from a pyramid-shaped or binary compensation commission system.
Considering their products are botanically based with an ingredient policy that prohibits many of the chemicals and fillers Mary Kay and Avon still use in their own products, I’d say they’ve established a business for men and woman who are truly serious about the health of their skin, not just the evenness of their complexion. A little research goes a long way.

Norman Newbie owns a software company with ten salespeople and one product. He’s not a very savvy marketer, so his sales process currently involves handing his salespeople lists of leads that he purchased online and having them “dial for dollars.” His salespeople frequently get frustrated since his leads aren’t always good quality. Because they’re usually calling on people who A) aren’t interested in his services and B) are not a good fit for them, the salespeople close less than 1% of the prospects they initially reach out to.
I see Melaleuca on here. I see that as both good and bad. They are an awesome company with a great compensation plan. However, they are not an MLM. They are not even listed with the federal agency that oversees those companies. They are a Consumer Direct Marketing company. How does that differ? While I am required to purchase a certain amount each month, that’s all I need to purchase. It’s all products I use in my own home for myself. I don’t have a monthly quota to meet. I don’t have to buy product and sell it to people. The idea is that the product goes to the consumer only. In fact, it’s against company policy to buy product and sell it to others. The only comparison I see are the “levels” of customerS in my group. Can you shed any light on why you think they are an MLM? Thanks, so much!

I learned seo and blogging, failed at that. I learned Facebook ads and email marketing, learned how to target the right demographics for Doterra, now people contact me wanting to know about the oils, then I got present and sign up, this my friend’s is the best of both worlds and what everyone should learn, find your form of marketing, go teach and sign up and leave for friends and family alone, unless you know they’ll want it.


The sales funnel doesn’t need to be complicated to make you money. Simplicity works best, so if you have that has a lot of steps, go through it and see if there are some you can remove. One key is a to have good communication with your leads, provide them with information about what you are selling, engage with them, answer questions, let the evaluate and decide. Another is to make sure you have enough leads in your Stage 1 section, otherwise, if you don’t have enough people to trickle down through this first part, you waste resources in the other sections. Be sure to have enough resources delegated to the rest of the funnel, as well, to convert those that trickle down.

First, Elliot, thank you for this article. Your sense of truly wanting to help comes through and it’s refreshing. Like MommyFinance, I too have suffered PTSD from previous runs at MLM but I have been looking for legitimate ways of making extra income and seems I’m being directed toward trying MLM again. Your article gave me hope that there are some good ones out there. What you said about finding the one that fits me and leaving a legacy for family really turned on a light for me and I greatly appreciate that. A wine business is not quite up my alley but I will certainly direct those who might be interested your way.
There are several names for multilevel marketing, including direct marketing, network marketing, referral marketing, direct sales and consumer direct marketing. In a typical MLM, an individual seller earns commissions in two ways: (1) from direct sales and (2) from sales generated by others recruited by the seller. The seller's recruits may have recruits of their own, and the original seller receives commissions from those sales as well. Download AARP Foundation's toolkit, Multilevel Marketing: The Research, Rewards and Rewards, to learn more about MLMs and decide whether one is right for you. 

Founded in 1972, LegalShield sells prepaid legal services. Their network consists of 50 independent provider law firms that service these prepaid legal plans. Legal Shield markets identity theft protection and restoration plans. For example, if someone were to install a Snapchat spy on your phone, with a Legal Shield membership you would have some legal recourse. Additionally, Legal Shield services are sold as an employee benefit for small and large businesses. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/MuisTTn11r0/hqdefault.jpg
Sales agents in MLM companies frequently work for commissions on sales. In addition, MLM agents typically get commissions on the sales of their “downstream.” Sales agents are able to recruit new sales agents into their “downstream,” and those sales agents can recruit new agents as well. An MLM sales agent usually makes money from each sale in their “downstream,” creating a form of passive income.
Hey Erica, I’m a doterra gal also. Just over 3 years ago I just wanted to see if these hippie oils really worked from there I couldn’t keep my mouth shut and I share with whomever will listen. I recently read this in the leadership magazine and I love it. “An oil for every household, a drop to change a life”. That is my goal. I never plan to get rich off my sharing but if I can change a life, help someone along the way it will be worth my time.
In time I would like to branch out into multiple niches, but am unsure whether I can do this using one company name. If I am effectively emailing various lists (who have bought different niche products and are categorised into separate email lists), would it be best to use different email addresses and company names for each niche? I am unsure what to do, as I do not wish to appear to deceive anyone, but do not want to be protrayed as an expert in every area. 
×