Hi Miles, I've been following you on youtube for a while now 🙂 Really good and valuable information! I have a question for you which I could not figure out an answer to yet. Let's say I picked a niche and I found a number of products to promote. Do I need to have a website/blog for the niche? In addition to a funnel (or funnels). Or I can build it later? The reason I am asking is that at the moment I have no idea what content I need. Hope it makes sense. Thanks, SV
Your subscribers won't ALWAYS be on social media, or scrolling through their email inbox. But, they'll be near their phone, or on one of 100 Billion other sites reading blogs or articles, shopping, gaming, or surfing cool sites that they’re interested in. Use desktop and mobile messages that fly into their browsers (and onto their phones) and reach them no matter what they’re doing.
I know how frustrating it can seem to launch an online business and watch your spirits fizzle and you struggle to earn money. I also know how it feels to listen to all the naysayers casting their doubt. But the truth is that anyone can succeed as long as they stay persistent. Remember, this isn’t a sprint. It’s a marathon. You simply can’t expect overnight results in your search for the perfect money funnel. http://smartbusinesstrends.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/ClickFunnels-Review-2018_-My-Personal-Journey-With-Sales-Funnels-1.png

Traffic sources. As you’ve probably noticed throughout this article, different traffic sources work better for different stages in the marketing funnel. Sometimes, however, a traffic source can surprise you, so it is a good idea to track how many people are entering your marketing funnel from each source and stage so that you can give your top sources more budget and attention. https://blogv2new.clickfunnels.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/image56.png
Independent non-salaried participants, referred to as distributors (variously called "associates", "independent business owners", "independent agents", etc.), are authorized to distribute the company's products or services. They are awarded their own immediate retail profit from customers plus commission from the company, not downlines, through a multi-level marketing compensation plan, which is based upon the volume of products sold through their own sales efforts as well as that of their downline organization.
With so many of the fastest growing MLM companies pushing to have you join, it can get confusing when you’re looking at MLM products, compensation plans, where to get leads, marketing tips, and most of all – can I really make money with this? What you need to remember, is that the best MLM to join in your situation is going to come down to one thing – finding a product and a business you are excited about sharing!
I don’t know much about World Ventures, Greg. I do have some very respected friends in the business who build that business and I do trust them. In ANY network marketing business, it more often comes down to what the independent business owner is putting IN to their business. Are they following the plan religiously? There is no company out there that can legitimately promise a get-rich-quick plan. You have to assume MLM is a 4+ year build – and only then when you’re going full-out. Most people don’t have the stamina for that – but if they do or can learn it, people can make a lot of money in many different companies. https://cdn-evergreenprof.pressidium.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/clickfunnels-comp-chart.jpg
Teach them how and why they should bring that referral to you. What will the person doing the referring get? What will the referral themselves get? How exactly should they refer you?  Remember, you’re not the only one asking them for referrals, so taking the time to share what works best for you (and why it’s in their best interests) will help you stand out from the pack.
Another great approach for how to actually make money online is If you’re savvy with social media. You can start a social media marketing business and make money that way. It doesn’t take much effort. Get a grasp on the big platforms like Facebook and Instagram and Snapchat. Then get out there and market your services. That’s pretty much what it takes to win in this field.

People generally tend to prefer either the unilevel or the binary compensation plans. But, the breakaway compensation plan also has benefits of its own. With the breakaway compensation plan, creating breakaway legs offers more of an opportunity to build passive income. Ultimately, which compensation plan is best is up to where you think your strengths will help you excel most.

Generating revenue is a multi-step process in which you have to progressively nurture people before they are ready to make a purchase. A shoe salesperson is nurturing you when they ask your size, show you lots of options, help you try a few pairs on, and let you know about a deal. It’s giving you the information and support you need to make a decision about buying.  
Conversion rate: This is a really important metric. While your revenue and number of customers will tell you how much money your funnel is generating, your bottom-of-the-funnel conversion rate is an indicator of how effective are your tactics at converting leads into customers. How you obtain and calculate this conversion rate will depend largely on the tactic you decide to use. For example, if you are doing a product launch with an email sequence, you might want to look at the percentage of subscribers who became customers during the launch. If you want to learn how many people who visit your sales page end up becoming customers, you can use Google Analytics goals to keep track of this metric.   http://gedlynk.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/lead.png
I do agree that my wording was a bit 'aggressive' in the video... With that said, I am still driving traffic from FB directly to landing pages that have ~15 words max on them, to this day! My ad copy and my landing page copy are super similar... And I get a high relevance score... I've had no problems at all. One thing I recommend is setting up a business.facebook.com account, then setting up as many ad accounts as you can (not adding any credit card to them, tho) to just have some extra accounts there... Just in case.

If 18,000,000 Americans consider MLM their careers, yet only 0.3% actually succeed beyond average corporate America wages, do people realize that means there are barely more than 50,000 Americans “living the MLM dream” and almost 17,950,000 who just help the 50,000? Sad. I was part of team Tupperware decades ago because I wanted to buy Tupperware for my home for less. It took me about 14 months as a stay at home mother (never recruited, never pressured, my distributor didn’t like my attitude) to accomplish that task and then walked away. I live in rural America where so many fall to MLMs attempting to climb out of paycheck to paycheck living (very few good jobs) like the saved into a baptismal pool. “Disciples” is the perfect word. MLMs are just not thriving here. How many Americans can one recruit/sell to for building a business in a rural county with less than 20,000 other Americans of which 75% live below the poverty line? I see MLM victims everywhere. https://mk0sprout24comgnv2te.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/clickfunnels-donations.png
Why does the message matter so much? Well, most of you already know that fancy designs or graphics or websites don’t work on their own these days. Today, it’s about the copy. It’s about creating sizzling headlines that help to catch the attention of potential customers or clients and using weird, have-to-do-a-double-take images to pique the interest of people who are used to scrolling and skipping around from page to page.

I just started selling for one of the top 15 and I went in knowing that this was just supplemental cash and nothing that would support my family. I spend 15 minutes (mostly from my phone) a day on my business and am happy with what I’ve done thus far. If it covers groceries and some extras like clothes or shoes, I’m good. If I start to become even more successful, great. It’s my competitive nature to want to out rank others, so I find it to be more of a personal challenge than thinking I’m going to get rich and stay rich. I appreciate the article and the no BS attitude. https://stephenesketzis.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/leadpages-logo.png
Nate is the CEO and Founder of NateLeung.com, a website dedicated to helping regular hard-working people to build wildly successful businesses they can be proud of and pass a legacy to their families. He is also the author of The Rise of the Digital Nomad: How to escape the 9 to 5 and earn a profitable income online. Step by step, Nate will show you how to build a business from scratch with the right strategies and systems in place so you can earn the income you know you deserve and have the kind of life you have always dreamed about.
I agree with you that much of the industry is flawed, but what about an MLM that has a service rather than a product such as electricity. It’s not like that could go out of style or that once you buy it you don’t need it again or that your monthly supply is too much and you’re going to stop the monthly subscriptions. I can honestly say that I cannot stand most MLM companies because regardless what you believe or how much you like the product, if you have to try to convince someone else to use it then inevitably the system is flawed and eventually your residuals will dry up. Electricity though, that’s different in my opinion, no one has to convince me to use it, it just comes by default. Find me an MLM that is not selling so much as showing someone an alternative to what they already have to pay and I’d be interested. https://www.onlinedimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/builder.png
A couple of weeks ago, I returned from Boise, Idaho where I got a chance to hang out with, Russell Brunson. If you don’t know who he is, you’ve probably been hiding under a rock for the past couple of years. Brunson is the founder of a software company called ClickFunnels. Today, that company has grown into a behemoth and has shot past $100 million in sales and nearly 60,000 subscribers to its SaaS platform.
By providing them a low-cost front-end offer, you lower buyer risk. The focus with low ticket offers is about building long-term relationships with your customers so that you can really monetize and maximize your profit on the backend. Keep in mind that, with low ticket offers, oftentimes the goal isn’t even to make a profit. Rather, it’s solely to break even and acquire new leads.
MLMs have been made illegal in some jurisdictions as a mere variation of the traditional pyramid scheme, including in mainland China.[10][11] In jurisdictions where MLMs have not been made illegal, many illegal pyramid schemes attempt to present themselves as MLM businesses.[7] Given that the overwhelming majority of MLM participants cannot realistically make a net profit, let alone a significant net profit, but instead overwhelmingly operate at net losses, some sources have defined all MLMs as a type of pyramid scheme, even if they have not been made illegal like traditional pyramid schemes through legislative statutes.[4][19][20]
There are several names for multilevel marketing, including direct marketing, network marketing, referral marketing, direct sales and consumer direct marketing. In a typical MLM, an individual seller earns commissions in two ways: (1) from direct sales and (2) from sales generated by others recruited by the seller. The seller's recruits may have recruits of their own, and the original seller receives commissions from those sales as well. Download AARP Foundation's toolkit, Multilevel Marketing: The Research, Rewards and Rewards, to learn more about MLMs and decide whether one is right for you. 
Revenue per customer or customer lifetime value: Typically, you won’t get the same amount of revenue for every customer that you acquire. Some of them might purchase at a discount, some others might purchase several products. If you offer a subscription plan, not all of your customers will stay subscribed for the same amount of time. A simple way to calculate this is to add up all your revenue for a specific period of time, and divide it by the number of paying customers you acquired during that period. The point here is that you should understand how much money, on average, you are making for every customer that you acquire. This will help you work backwards from a revenue goal and determine how many customers you need to hit your goals. I recommend that you only run this analysis periodically instead of keeping track of it every day because you will probably see a lot of variability. Teachable also collects all the data you need to calculate this value—just download a spreadsheet of all of your transactions from the Transactions tab.  https://www.growthmarketingpro.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/clickfunnels-example-funnel-750x450.png
Creating funnels (sales) is designed to take your prospects through a process that starts with them “opting in” (typically with their name and email). It is a small commitment. It’s them, basically raising their hands and saying, yes, I would like some more information and I’m willing to give you my contact information in return for it. Are you seeing how powerful this can be?
How to get started: After analyzing data from thousands of online courses, we created a launch strategy you can use to launch your own business—you can click here learn about Teachable’s Crazy 8 Launch Strategy. Example For an example of a successful launch, you can check out one of my favorite posts on the Teachable blog. In this amazing case study, Nat Eliason explains exactly how he launched his first online course and made $48,150 in the process.   
It's completely totally an informational page, and then it clicks you to the next page in the funnel. This is not meant to be the end of the funnel. This would just be, this second page, I guess it could be any page type you want it to be, but the link at the bottom, what you're gonna want to do on the second page, regardless of what page type it is, is you're going to want to make this a URL, a link to a URL. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/M-AY7JpwNyU/maxresdefault.jpg
I just started selling for one of the top 15 and I went in knowing that this was just supplemental cash and nothing that would support my family. I spend 15 minutes (mostly from my phone) a day on my business and am happy with what I’ve done thus far. If it covers groceries and some extras like clothes or shoes, I’m good. If I start to become even more successful, great. It’s my competitive nature to want to out rank others, so I find it to be more of a personal challenge than thinking I’m going to get rich and stay rich. I appreciate the article and the no BS attitude.
MLMers often stick to the three-foot rule (everyone within 3-feet of you is a prospect) and other traditional marketing tactics. But direct sales is like any other business. It can and should be marketed in a variety of ways that takes into consideration your target market, what it needs, how you can help it, and where it can be found. To that end, you can use a variety of marketing tools including a website (check your companies policies about websites), email,​ and social media to increase product sales and interest in your business.

Once your target audience is aware of their needs and your company they move into the “think” stage. This is where it gets tricky—the majority of consumer research happens in this stage, and the research and discovery loop takes them back and forth through different mediums. During this stage, it’s crucial to build your authority and get your target audience onto your website.
Other than that, great info, but I’d have to respectfully disagree with the logic behind not being a part of an MLM. It’s one business model. And whether you want to make it your full time job or just dabble, so long as you find a product and company you love, it can be a great way to diversify your income streams. $5000 a year (or $5) is more than most people make on their 401K, savings or any other conventional ways of investing. It’s an investment, and for those that chose to continue through the plateau, it results in residual income. Don’t like sales? Some of the companies are moving away from the door to door type sales models and putting a lot more emphasis on team building and adding value. And many companies are also discouraging distributors from spamming on social media- again- it comes down to the individual and their own business acumen. We can spend our lives blaming they systems or we can just own ourselves and be grateful for whatever we’ve learned from, and created out of each opportunity presented to us. It’s the choice of the individual at the end of the day but one thing I can say with certainty is that someone who blames MLM for their lack of success is lacking responsibility for themselves in other areas of their life too. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Z-ywEnz7QcY/hqdefault.jpg
In time I would like to branch out into multiple niches, but am unsure whether I can do this using one company name. If I am effectively emailing various lists (who have bought different niche products and are categorised into separate email lists), would it be best to use different email addresses and company names for each niche? I am unsure what to do, as I do not wish to appear to deceive anyone, but do not want to be protrayed as an expert in every area.
comes down to leadership and the individual. I even changed teams to find the right mentor and coaching when I knew I was struggling. I found a team that trains people to be some network marketing professionals, and really the math is simple and anyone can make residual income if they do it correctly. The problem is people sign everyone up they can and then most drop out. You only want to work with those that are committed to do the work and be able to work closely with them until they are a developed leader. In all actuality ssigning everyone up as an associate is against the rules and a big no no. Having customers benefits everyone and in most business models like the one I’m with I make more commission off customers than associates that aren’t working. https://www.onlinedimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Clickfunnels-pricing.png
This article was really informative and honest! I’m not presently involved in an MLM and I don’t ever plan to be especially after reading this article and the comments below. Why? Well because of EXACTLY the kind of “networking” and “recruiting” that these companies and many of the people commenting on here are advocating. I have been bombarded on my facebook, and other social media from people I haven’t spoken to or seen in years. Its becoming constant, and I am not on social media to make money. Roden and Fields, shakeology, some girl I went to high school with is now trying to get me to buy leggins from her. I have a cousin that I actively avoid now because he is constantly steering every single conversation to Herbellife and why I NEED it to be healthy. Jesus. Its just enough already. I’m all for empowering people, and I love the idea of earning an additional income to take care of your family or yourself. But I could not imagine alienating or even just annoying friends and family in order to make an extra dollar. What I dislike most is that many of those that are recruiting make it seem as if they recruiting you simply because they want to “help” you or provide you with an opportunity. They make it seem as if they are doing this out of the goodness of their hearts, when really the actual motivation is line their own pockets with more money, because the more people you recruit for your team, the more money you make. That feels dishonest and slimy to me. Unless I’m asking for “help” or an “opportunity” I wish people would assume that I don’t need and am not interested in one!
I highly recommend you at least have one funnel in place to generate customers in your business, whether it's a service or product-based business, because it will help keep your company safe. It will help keep you safe from the FTC coming in and saying, “Look, you just have a big down line full of people that only buy the product themselves. You don't have real customers. Thus you're not a real business.” 
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