This is awesome! I didn’t know there was an MLM company that sells wine. I may look into this. I’m still on the search for a solid company. I pretty much have PTSD with MLM companies because of past teams I signed up under. They were all about hype and money but never did explain HOW to build the business. It was so bad that I am now more cautious and aware of these type of people.
Although emphasis is always made on the potential of success and the positive life change that "might" or "could" (not "will" or "can") result, it is only in otherwise difficult to find disclosure statements (or at the very least, difficult to read and interpret disclosure statements), that MLM participants are given fine print disclaimers that they as participants should not rely on the earning results of other participants in the highest levels of the MLM participant pyramid as an indication of what they should expect to earn. MLMs very rarely emphasize the extreme likelihood of failure, or the extreme likelihood of financial loss, from participation in MLM. MLMs are also seldom forthcoming about the fact that any significant success of the few individuals at the top of the MLM participant pyramid is in fact dependant on the continued financial loss and failure of all other participants below them in the MLM pyramid.
But please do a little research before you blanket insult an entire industry or business model. I am a single mother with a 6 figure income because of MLM, nearly twice that when I’m actively working my business with both of the companies I represent, and while not everyone has the skill set to succeed in this business, the potential is certainly there, for those that do.
To put these statistics into context, John compared them with the failure rates for traditional small businesses using the Small Business Administration’s statistics for 2008. And he discovered that 44% of small businesses survive at least four years, 31% at least seven years, and 39% are profitable over the life of their business. In 10 years only 64% of small businesses fail.
This comes back to the money-versus-time paradigm. If you have the money to run ads and traffic, great. If you don’t, you need other alternatives. In fact, this specific dilemma forced me to learn search engine optimization. And it was one of the best decisions I ever made. Not only is this great for running your own traffic, but you can also work with clients and charge untold amounts of money to optimize their sites for keywords.

But, once you have enough experience to be eligible (and are likely itching for a promotion), they start marketing to you. It might be email marketing or an email list-based retargeting campaign, but these graduate programs do their level best to get back on your radar. It’s a long-term play, but it’s one that works incredibly well because the schools know exactly when their students are “ready to buy” again. https://i.ytimg.com/vi/noI9VaYU3VA/maxresdefault.jpg

How to get started: The easiest way to start a community is to leverage tools that are already built for this purpose. Our preferred one for its simplicity is a closed Facebook Group. When you’re just starting your group, it’s important for you to define some basic guidelines for participation and interactions within your group, this will tell you what’s acceptable and what isn’t within your group. You can join Teachable’s Facebook group, The Teachable Tribe, to check out how we did this.
I know how frustrating it can seem to launch an online business and watch your spirits fizzle and you struggle to earn money. I also know how it feels to listen to all the naysayers casting their doubt. But the truth is that anyone can succeed as long as they stay persistent. Remember, this isn’t a sprint. It’s a marathon. You simply can’t expect overnight results in your search for the perfect money funnel. http://smartbusinesstrends.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/ClickFunnels-Review-2018_-My-Personal-Journey-With-Sales-Funnels-1.png
This lead capture software ranges from simple to complex. You can have a landing page that captures the data, or you can sign up for a system that tracks your user's accounts once they sign in. You can see what products they looked at, what pages they read and, judging from their account activity, you can see how likely they are to become customers.
I have been looking over your sites and viewing the many videos. It sounds appealing however there are many many . . . many lead generators out there, some that are well established (and very good at what they do) and so my question is why would I pay you to train me for 5 weeks and think I could compete (let alone generate income) in the short period you mention?
Remember that a conversion is simply one piece in a very large customer relationship-building and experience-generating puzzle. Funnel conversion rate is not the be-all-end-all of your marketing effort with that customer. Sometimes, the conversation after the conversion can make just as much of a difference in filling your funnel as chasing down every source of reliable traffic.
I have been in network marketing for 20 years having good success, I have not used CF yet, but for what I see this could be a great marriage. The advantage of network marketing over affiliate and even continuity programs is the fact that some of the people you sponsor will continue growing there business creating a return on your money much bigger than any other program, example, if just couple of people see the vision, you can suddenly have a stream of new people coming without spending any more money in ads. Even today most of the growth of network marketing comes from the personal contacts, and with social media, the circle of influences are much bigger! The purpose for me with CF is to add new center of influences where I can leverage my business many times over. I see CF as a powerful tool to increase circle of influences!
That’s the main question you want to ask yourself in the final stage of the new digital marketing funnel—because there really isn’t a “final” stage in the buyer’s journey. Any business owner knows that it’s easier to keep an existing customer than it is to generate brand new ones, so invest in keeping your current customers. Hopefully, after your new customer made a purchase, they start their journey all over again with another one of your products. Or, even better, they become a brand advocate and start selling your product or service for you in the form of recommendations. https://cdn-evergreenprof.pressidium.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2017-04-10_16-04-29.png

If you’re running an accounting business, at this stage, your customers would be evaluating different potential service providers. They might need resources like pricing guides (so they know what ballpark rates are), how to evaluate the landscape of accounting services (i.e. whether to hire a solo accountant, an agency, etc), or how to choose an accountant.
Once your target audience is aware of their needs and your company they move into the “think” stage. This is where it gets tricky—the majority of consumer research happens in this stage, and the research and discovery loop takes them back and forth through different mediums. During this stage, it’s crucial to build your authority and get your target audience onto your website.
The answer, is mostly guidance. Whether that comes in the form of mentorship, software, education, or start up materials, most of us need to have something that helps us build out what we are envisioning. While we can’t help you with the actual idea or the materials required, we have the software and the training for you. We’re doing the intellectual heavy lifting with your growth and development. https://blogv2new.clickfunnels.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/cf-img-1-1024x475.png
A couple of weeks ago, I returned from Boise, Idaho where I got a chance to hang out with, Russell Brunson. If you don’t know who he is, you’ve probably been hiding under a rock for the past couple of years. Brunson is the founder of a software company called ClickFunnels. Today, that company has grown into a behemoth and has shot past $100 million in sales and nearly 60,000 subscribers to its SaaS platform.
Technically, I’m a rep for 3 companies, but only use one as my business (the others are because I love the products and want the discount). One does give a financial reward for recruiting and that makes me uncomfortable even though I understand that corporate recruiters also get paid for doing the same), they other has sales minimums and if I were to work the business, would probably have so drop a few hundred bucks into it. It would probably be worth it, but I don’t care for the mentality of the company executives or the sales minimums they impose the stay an active rep. Those things said, they are not shady companies and people who are committed to doing the work (as you have to do with ANY job or business) can succeed in their goals. https://images.g2crowd.com/uploads/product/image/social_landscape/social_landscape_1489716108/clickfunnels.png
Market America is just as known for their massive discounted products portal as they are for their crazy rich CEOs. I’m talking Forbes list, mansion in Biscayne Bay and penthouse in Manhattan, celeb bffs, and giant yachts rich…all thanks to MLM. They’ve hit their fair share of SEC-shaped road blocks, but Market America is still going strong at #29 on the DSN Global 100.

Thanks for the list. As with anything it’s a matter of opinion and you have to put in the work to see results. If you’re just doing parties in your hometown, that’s probably not going to work. With all the tools you have in the Internet you can really promote whatever it is you’re selling. If you want to be successful with a good company, you have to look at it as a business and roll up your sleeves.


Agree with most of your comments. Born and raised in the corporate community, we never even considered a MLM until came across one after retirement. Looking back we would have looked seriously at the industry much earlier. In any event, we had one good run until management made a few very bad decisions…killing 40 % of our business. But now we’ve found a new home with WGN. Among the many differences is they’re a technolgy company operating as a MLM…go figure.

Hello Miles, thank you for the valuable information. I want to get started as an affiliate marketer but I am afraid to use my real name. I have a PhD in Public Health from a reputable university and this stops me from marketing products because I am afraid I may be judged for marketing products that may not be based on scientific evidence. I want to have the freedom to sell all products. How do I get over this block? Can I still build a list without using myself as the brand? How do I succeed if I am working behind the scenes? What name do I use? A fake name or use a company name? Thank you!
The reality is, only a tiny percentage of representatives actually realize the high earnings advertised in MLM promotional materials and at meetings. Some say the big earners got in early and are positioned at the top; however, like other MLM data, this is misleading. First, it suggests that getting in early is all you need to do to be successful, which of course is false. Success comes from work. Second, many companies have been around for over 30 years, and some of their top selling reps joined last year or five years ago.
You can learn more about it here. The coaching program that allowed me to quit my 9 to 5 for good, a business model which requires no recruiting. Instead of talking to people with no money, you only do business with small business owners that’s got money to throw down and you solve their number 1 problem which is they need more customers from the internet.
The way that would work into an online sales funnel for your network marketing business would be something along the lines of a headline that says, “Attention struggling network marketer, have you been out of the industry for 10 years, never found success? Or have you've been out of your company for X number of days? You loved the industry, but you never found success, maybe because,” and then some bullet points.
How to get started: Everything about SEO, including its name, acronym, and definition sounds way more complex than it really is. I recommend that you start with performing keyword research and optimizing your content. You can find all about how to do that in this blog post. After that’s done, you should look into link building, which is nothing else than getting other websites to link to your content. I recommend that you checkout Backlinko’s excellent link building guide. 
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