Most prospects will enter this stage after identifying Norman’s company as a possible alternative and completing the information search process described in Stage 2. However, some customers might be introduced to his brand after completing Stage 2 with his competitors, as in the case of an industry blog running a comparison chart of the different competitors in his space.
Do you have any information on how to set up and link Landing Page, Thank you page, etc. in Thrive (For an Affiliate funnel) like you do with Clickfunnels? I have read and watched several times (above) but am not able to convert Clickfunnel understanding to Thrive. I have watched several tutorials in Thrive University and haven't yet seen how to do that. Any assistance is greatly appreciated; Thank you! https://thrivethemes.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/A-Complex-Funnel.png
Hey Matt! Thanks for this article, it was super helpful! I tried to scroll through some of the comments, but figured I should just shoot you a message. There weren’t a ton of B2C examples in your list and was hoping you had some more up your sleeve. I just launched my company, Make It Hapin, and I’m living on a prayer haha. My finances are limited so my ability to pay for ads in order to test possible funnels is very limited but I’m trying. Make It Hapin is a personalized shopping service designed to help you recreate inspiration images you see on Pinterest and Instagram. The struggle is figuring out a way to get people to remember us while they’re swiping through their feeds. Anyway, I’ve included my website…I’d love it if you could take a look!
Norman Newbie owns a software company with ten salespeople and one product. He’s not a very savvy marketer, so his sales process currently involves handing his salespeople lists of leads that he purchased online and having them “dial for dollars.” His salespeople frequently get frustrated since his leads aren’t always good quality. Because they’re usually calling on people who A) aren’t interested in his services and B) are not a good fit for them, the salespeople close less than 1% of the prospects they initially reach out to.
And these sales aren’t just to customers. You see, in order to join an MLM you usually need to buy products to sell (often referred to as a starter kit, or similar). And then in order to remain a seller, stylist, supervisor, or whatever term the company uses, you often need to make a minimum number of sales in a given time period (though not always).
Bottom line: if you’re someone considering an MLM, know what you want from it (discount, part time income, time away from other life duties, a career opportunity, etc), follow you passion in choosing a product/company, do your research , be aware and willing to set a work schedule and actually spend that time working every day (at least in the beginning), do the trainings recommended, have a growth mindset and don’t give up unless you can honestly say you’ve don’t what’s required….
As a note, stages one and five have been left out of this model. Though all companies should have a plan for addressing post-purchase follow-up, it’s up to you to determine whether or not it’s worth your company’s time to try to reach buyers in the first stage of the process. It can be difficult to convince people that they have a problem if they haven’t already felt it themselves, but if you’re selling a new type of product that meets a previously unrealized need, you might want to focus your energy on this area.

I joined in the mid-90’s under a Dr that paid my way. We were somewhere in Paul Orberson’s dowline, below an AR kid making $80K+/month. I didn’t actually sign anyone as a rep, and just enjoyed doing the pitch to the crowd in the hotels, restaurants, and eventually auditoriums. I got paid by the Dr to tell the “long distance” story, and he went all the way to there top tier in under a year.
This comes back to the money-versus-time paradigm. If you have the money to run ads and traffic, great. If you don’t, you need other alternatives. In fact, this specific dilemma forced me to learn search engine optimization. And it was one of the best decisions I ever made. Not only is this great for running your own traffic, but you can also work with clients and charge untold amounts of money to optimize their sites for keywords.
The binary compensation plan has recently gained popularity because of its simplicity and the growth opportunities involved. Unfortunately, the plan has been so misused that it has been hit with many state and federal regulations. Government actions against such companies have been very public, resulting in bad press for the companies and a bad reputation for MLMs using the binary compensation plan.
Hey Middle man took my line. As I was reading this I was thinking you hit the nail on the head. My brother got involved with one and so did my uncle Amway. I know my brother made no money. I have to check with my uncle but I am certain he didn’t. The only reason these companies get away with it, and it’s not illegal is because they have a product/. They don’t sell their products, they sell the pyramid part of it. And the meeting they go do are motivational meetings with their bible Rich Dad Poor Dad. I call them their “Rah Rah” meetings https://bloggingwithfunnels.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/ClickFunnels-vs-Kartra-The-Ultimate-Review.jpg
The other thing that you can do is setup a landing page. Even if you found thousands of prospects, you haven’t captured their email address yet. You’re wasting a lot of energy just to recruit them and add them to your contact list. In order to capture their email addresses, you’re going to need to build a compelling and conversion optimized landing page. https://winningwp.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/ClickFunnels-Editor-03.png
I joined in the mid-90’s under a Dr that paid my way. We were somewhere in Paul Orberson’s dowline, below an AR kid making $80K+/month. I didn’t actually sign anyone as a rep, and just enjoyed doing the pitch to the crowd in the hotels, restaurants, and eventually auditoriums. I got paid by the Dr to tell the “long distance” story, and he went all the way to there top tier in under a year.
Stephen, this was a fantastic article and full of great advice to help someone start out and make money network marketing. We need people like you to put out this helpful information for those that need it. I love Click Funnels. This site is the first one online that truly has everything that anyone needs to build an online business. Thanks again and I look forward to more great content.
A conversion funnel, or sales funnel, is the path that a prospect takes through your site that ultimately results in a conversion. Because the amount of traffic (visitors) your website gets will likely be larger, with prospects dropping off at various points in that path, those that do convert will be a smaller percentage of the original group – thus the funnel shape.
I don’t know much about World Ventures, Greg. I do have some very respected friends in the business who build that business and I do trust them. In ANY network marketing business, it more often comes down to what the independent business owner is putting IN to their business. Are they following the plan religiously? There is no company out there that can legitimately promise a get-rich-quick plan. You have to assume MLM is a 4+ year build – and only then when you’re going full-out. Most people don’t have the stamina for that – but if they do or can learn it, people can make a lot of money in many different companies.
Instead of selling other people’s products, why not create your own? Whether it’s handmade jewelry, wedding decorations, or baked goods, you can enjoy lower costs and higher margins by selling your own products. Depending on what you’d like to sell, you can create an Etsy shop, put up listings on Facebook Marketplace, or set up a table at your local farmer’s market.

He contrasts these statistics with the failure rates for traditional small businesses, using the Small Business Administration’s statistics for 2008 that found that 44% of small businesses survive at least four years and 31% at least seven years, and 39% of businesses are profitable over the life of the small business. Only 64% of small businesses fail in 10 years.
I do agree that my wording was a bit 'aggressive' in the video... With that said, I am still driving traffic from FB directly to landing pages that have ~15 words max on them, to this day! My ad copy and my landing page copy are super similar... And I get a high relevance score... I've had no problems at all. One thing I recommend is setting up a business.facebook.com account, then setting up as many ad accounts as you can (not adding any credit card to them, tho) to just have some extra accounts there... Just in case.

In time I would like to branch out into multiple niches, but am unsure whether I can do this using one company name. If I am effectively emailing various lists (who have bought different niche products and are categorised into separate email lists), would it be best to use different email addresses and company names for each niche? I am unsure what to do, as I do not wish to appear to deceive anyone, but do not want to be protrayed as an expert in every area.

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