You are right in that most MLM have monthly dues and have high entry fees to be distributors or consultants. You are also right in that most MLM companies focus on recruitment and not product sales. I’ve been working with Arbonne now for quite a while and none of those comments apply to this company, which is why I believe they have survived and are only growing at this point, despite some people’s opinion that they will soon be relics like Mary Kay. To become a consultant is a mere $75 dollars, the kit is involved with all free samples and material. Product loading is prohibited. Each event we host regularly ends with most if not all attendees becoming a preferred client for $20 joining fee for the first year and a $15 renewal every year with no monthly expectation and a guaranteed minimum of 20% off of all stock at all times and 40% off of all packages at all times. Not only that consultants can will their business down 6 generations, and the Mercedes incentive is for a purchase, not a lease. We do look to grow our network, but we emphasize this takes hard work and is not a get rich quick scheme. While you hit the nail on the head with most MLM businesses, there are MLM businesses like Arbonne who are a cut above the rest and who are in the habit of not putting pressure on anyone attending to either purchase or join as a consultant. We only want the best in our network and we have thousands of examples of very successful men and woman to show for it. Great article!!!


"Network marketing" and "multi-level marketing" (MLM) have been described by author Dominique Xardel as being synonymous, with it being a type of direct selling.[6] Some sources emphasize that multi-level marketing is merely one form of direct selling, rather than being direct selling.[23][24] Other terms that are sometimes used to describe multi-level marketing include "word-of-mouth marketing", "interactive distribution", and "relationship marketing". Critics have argued that the use of these and other different terms and "buzzwords" is an effort to distinguish multi-level marketing from illegal Ponzi schemes, chain letters, and consumer fraud scams.[25]
Hi JP. Good stuff all the way around, my man. Hey, I’ve been approached by Ariix, & didn’t know if have heard of them, and if so, a simple 👍 or 👎 will suffice, unless you’d like to elaborate, of course. One obvious concern I have is that (& can disclose this, since it’s of public record/knowledge per the list above), the current leadership in place at Ariix all came from USANA, and given the FBI/SEC became involved with USANA in ‘07, & Ariix opened in ‘11, well….I think you know from where I’m coming as it relates to anything you may be able to convey. Thx again, JP, for all of your efforts, & if you’d feel more comfortable in emailing me, obviously that would be perfectly fine! And apologies on this extremely verbose message!😳
Great article, thank you for including some statistics. I do have a few friends who make a bit of side money with selling DoTerra and Norwex, but I also think they mostly do it to get wholesale prices on products they want to purchase anyway. It’s incredibly difficult to actually make a profit unless you’re willing to pour your entire life into the company.
Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing. https://mk0sprout24comgnv2te.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/powtoon-webinar-registration-campaign.png
A couple of weeks ago, I returned from Boise, Idaho where I got a chance to hang out with, Russell Brunson. If you don’t know who he is, you’ve probably been hiding under a rock for the past couple of years. Brunson is the founder of a software company called ClickFunnels. Today, that company has grown into a behemoth and has shot past $100 million in sales and nearly 60,000 subscribers to its SaaS platform.
Independent non-salaried participants, referred to as distributors (variously called "associates", "independent business owners", "independent agents", etc.), are authorized to distribute the company's products or services. They are awarded their own immediate retail profit from customers plus commission from the company, not downlines, through a multi-level marketing compensation plan, which is based upon the volume of products sold through their own sales efforts as well as that of their downline organization. http://schmitz-katze.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/clickfunnels-1-1024x576.jpg
The company. Too many people get lured by the hype, without stopping to consider the company or its product/service. What does the company sell and can you get excited about it? What are the compensation plan, marketing system, and policies, and can you work with it? Is it a member of the DSA, and through your research, been found to be a legitimate company?
I love love love this article! I’m a business growth coach who works with small business owners and often leaders from other MLM’s. From time to time I’ll get someone who has been struggling significantly even getting started and I find that it’s sheer absence of knowledge of the numbers. They are still under the impression that if I get three, and they get three then we’re all going to be millionaires. It’s very sad but the truth is not being told. Being in an MLM is hard. But it is very doable. I have had significant success in the past, while I am not in an MLM now. Nor do I want to be, you must be all In to make it work. Thank you for sharing this. I would love to interview you on one of my webinars
Unlike other distribution methods MLM/NM companies don't advertise their products on TV or other mass media but rather depend on their customers to share the experience and recommend the products to their friends and relatives through word of mouth. They in return get 10-12 % profit of the sale value. Word of mouth/ recommending someone is a very powerful marketing tool which is cheaper and could reach more people because the selling of product is based on trust. Would you not buy a product your close friend uses and finds beneficial and asks you to try ?
If you want the efforts you put in today to pay off far into the future, choose a company that has proven it intends to be around for the long term. Approximately 90 percent of all network marketing companies fail within their first two years. You don't want to invest your precious time and resources—not to mention your future—in something that may not be in business next month.
Multi-level marketing (simplified Chinese: 传销; traditional Chinese: 傳銷; pinyin: chuán xiāo) was first introduced to China by American, Taiwanese, and Japanese companies following the Chinese economic reform of 1978. This rise in multi-level marketing's popularity coincided with economic uncertainty and a new shift towards individual consumerism. Multi-level marketing was banned on the mainland by the government in 1998, citing social, economic, and taxation issues.[62] Further regulation "Prohibition of Chuanxiao" (where MLM is a type of Chuanxiao was enacted in 2005, clause 3 of Chapter 2 of the regulation states having downlines is illegal).[11] O'Regan wrote 'With this regulation China makes clear that while Direct Sales is permitted in the mainland, Multi-Level Marketing is not'.[10]
Netflix changes its background image based on what movies and shows are being promoted. Their site is very simple. There’s a risk reversal right off the bat. You can cancel any time and not be locked into anything. You can try it free for a month. They’re not saying, “Hey, this is movies streaming online.” They’re relying on the power of their brand.
Hello Miles, thank you for the valuable information. I want to get started as an affiliate marketer but I am afraid to use my real name. I have a PhD in Public Health from a reputable university and this stops me from marketing products because I am afraid I may be judged for marketing products that may not be based on scientific evidence. I want to have the freedom to sell all products. How do I get over this block? Can I still build a list without using myself as the brand? How do I succeed if I am working behind the scenes? What name do I use? A fake name or use a company name? Thank you! https://mk0sprout24comgnv2te.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/clickfunnels-integrations.png
Exits from stage. The exits from stage metric is very similar to your time in stage metric, but it allows you to see how many potential customers you are completely losing in a particular stage. For example, if your potential clients spend a year on your email list before they buy (but most of them do eventually buy), that’s a time in stage problem. If people spend 5 days on your email list before they buy, but 98% of them unsubscribe within 5 days, that’s an exits from stage problem.
Not only can you charge a flat fee, but you can even charge a small percentage of the take. It all depends on your experience and how savvy you are at building funnels. If you’re not already a ClickFunnels Certified Partner, get your certification and get the accolades and acknowledgment you need for breathing assurances into just about any potential client you’ve got the so-called skills to pay the builds.

If you want to learn more about all the features and benefits, read this post that I wrote about ClickFunnels not too long ago. But at the end of the day, ClickFunnels provides an easy-to-use system that will help you build out your landing pages in a super-simple interface that allows you to quickly integrate email providers, payment processors, drop-ship stations and so much more.


Multi-level marketing (simplified Chinese: 传销; traditional Chinese: 傳銷; pinyin: chuán xiāo) was first introduced to China by American, Taiwanese, and Japanese companies following the Chinese economic reform of 1978. This rise in multi-level marketing's popularity coincided with economic uncertainty and a new shift towards individual consumerism. Multi-level marketing was banned on the mainland by the government in 1998, citing social, economic, and taxation issues.[62] Further regulation "Prohibition of Chuanxiao" (where MLM is a type of Chuanxiao was enacted in 2005, clause 3 of Chapter 2 of the regulation states having downlines is illegal).[11] O'Regan wrote 'With this regulation China makes clear that while Direct Sales is permitted in the mainland, Multi-Level Marketing is not'.[10] https://gedlynk.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SAMCART.png
Thanks Matt, the client attraction stage is the big thing. With relatively low client numbers I’m able nurture and provide relevant & specific information. I look arrange phone or in person meetings. So attracting clients who can identify with a specific or range of personal (to them) challenges which I’m able to demonstrate I can solve is perhaps the primary focus for me at the prospect acquisition point. I hope that makes sense:)

I found your article interesting. My wife and I have been involved with AdvoCare since November 2011. Even if I never make another dime in AdvoCare, I will continue to use the products because they have worked and continue to work for us. What I find interesting is the statistic that the majority – 99.7% in MLM actually “lose” money. What is the context of that statistic? That would mean A: the majority of MLM companies don’t have a buyback or return policy B: people that get started with MLM’s have to take on much more inventory that they are able to sell or C: this statistic is not accurate. I believe that C is the right answer. I do agree there are flaws in the MLM industry just as there are flaws in every industry. However, I believe that the MLM industry has made huge improvements in recent years and we do have a better way. People are the variable. When you have a great product, a passion and purpose that drives you everyday, are teachable and coachable, and love others as much as you love yourself, you can be successful in this business. Through the process of investing in your own personal development and learning to serve others, you are able to lead others to do the same. Thanks again. I look forward to reading more from you in the near future.


The way that would work into an online sales funnel for your network marketing business would be something along the lines of a headline that says, “Attention struggling network marketer, have you been out of the industry for 10 years, never found success? Or have you've been out of your company for X number of days? You loved the industry, but you never found success, maybe because,” and then some bullet points.
Each year, ClickFunnels offers its customers the opportunity to experience a once in a lifetime event unlike any other in the industry. There’s a reason why so many people claim that it’s the best event that they have ever been to. When it comes to Funnel Hacking Live, Russell’s philosophy is that it needs to be like Christmas for Funnel Hackers. It’s about building up our community and offering them the best information that we have at the time. It’s all about giving each of our clients the most information and knowledge that we can in four days. https://howtoretireearly.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/how-to-create-landing-page-1024x297.jpg
At some point, a visitor becomes a potential customer when they consider whether the service or product offered is a match for their needs. This may happen during their first visit to your website or months later. We often get lost in conversions and forget about the number of returning visitors. Our content and its messaging should speak to consumers who may be on-the-fence or just doing research at the time and return later for their purchase. A single serving message that attempts to get the visitor to convert now is usually the case for the majority of websites content. We lose sight that not everyone will convert on the first visit. However, at this point in the online marketing funnel, we want to make our unique value proposition clear and provide information that the user needs to make the purchasing decision.

A marketing qualified lead (MQL) is a prospective customer who has demonstrated a particular level of engagement that leads the marketing team to conclude that real sales potential exists. The level of complexity involved in this assessment will vary based on the resources available to the team. Norman, for example, might conclude that anybody who fills out his online demonstration request form is an MQL. A company that’s using a marketing automation program might be able to set the bar to MQL qualification at something involving a combination of viewing specific pages, interacting with certain forms, and opening a certain number of email messages. https://changecreator.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/null-5.png
Webinars: With webinars, you have an engaged audience that’s akin to being in the same room with others while pitching whatever product or service you’re offering. This is a great way to sell high-ticket products and services as well. Sure, lead to application to phone call is great, but a webinar really sells like there is no tomorrow. Most people also like to combine the webinar with an application, pushing them to the app after the webinar is completed and closing the deal on a phone call.
A salesperson can build his commission rate by advancing in rank/steps and by recruiting new distributors. Consider the commission rate of 10 percent if you were on the third step. If you recruit three distributors who meet their goals and earn the commission of 6 percent, then you earn something called differential commission, which is the difference between your commission and the commission of your recruits (an extra 4 percent). This way, your commission is tied to the group’s commission as well, ensuring a group effort when recruiting and selling.
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