Because of the encouraging of recruits to further recruit their competitors, some people have even gone so far as to say at best modern MLMs are nothing more than legalized pyramid schemes[4][19][20] with one stating "Multi-level marketing companies have become an accepted and legally sanctioned form of pyramid scheme in the United States"[19] while another states "Multi-Level Marketing, a form of Pyramid Scheme, is not necessarily fraudulent."[20] In October 2010 it was reported that multilevel marketing companies were being investigated by a number of state attorneys general amid allegations that salespeople were primarily paid for recruiting and that more recent recruits cannot earn anything near what early entrants do.[60] Industry critic Robert L. FitzPatrick has called multi-level marketing "the Main Street bubble" that will eventually burst.[61]
If you are realistic about your budget for inventory and time commitment, direct selling can be a great way to earn extra cash or even launch a full-time career. It may be statistically unlikely, but there are sellers who are earning six-figure salaries and taking free vacations every month. If you go in with both eyes open, it’s possible you could be one of them (just don’t count on it).
Conversion rate: This is a really important metric. While your revenue and number of customers will tell you how much money your funnel is generating, your bottom-of-the-funnel conversion rate is an indicator of how effective are your tactics at converting leads into customers. How you obtain and calculate this conversion rate will depend largely on the tactic you decide to use. For example, if you are doing a product launch with an email sequence, you might want to look at the percentage of subscribers who became customers during the launch. If you want to learn how many people who visit your sales page end up becoming customers, you can use Google Analytics goals to keep track of this metric.   https://i.ytimg.com/vi/YJkLVofBF_s/maxresdefault.jpg
Each company will have a different startup cost, which is a fee that new distributors must pay to begin distributing. Companies with high startup costs are more likely to be recruitment-centric MLMs. MLMs that focus on recruitment are generally called pyramid schemes, or schemes designed only to tie down new recruits instead of selling quality products to interested customers.
If you recruit a distributor who advances to the final step and breaks away from your group, what happens to your commissions? Yes, your total group volume will take a hit, because you’ve lost one of your best recruits. However, most companies will provide you with a bonus commission, referred to as an override commission, for creating breakaway legs (or recruits that end up breaking away, forming their own group).

Great article Matt! I have a product-based business (skincare to be precise) and I’ve been doing a lot of research on sales funnels over the past few days but only ever come across examples for service-based businesses and struggle to apply those to my business. I do offer a free skincare guide at opt in but can’t think of anything else for the follow up emails to create trust as well as a limited time offer. Would you have any suggestions?
However, when you succeed, you can definitely make lots of money online. Not just a little bit. Some successful ad agencies are making five to six figures per month in revenue. That’s significant by anyone’s standards. But then there’s people like Nicholas Kusmich who are absolutely crushing it in the ad agency game. Just ensure that you do your due diligence before you sign up to anyone’s program or buy anyone’s course to start your own agency.
Network marketing companies, MLMs, and referral marketing companies that have been around longer are more trustworthy. Why is that? Government regulations on MLMS have increased in severity and frequency over the years. Companies that have survived such regulations will also have to have survived the threat of lawsuits, bad publicity, and negative feedback from unsatisfied distributors — not many companies would be able to survive this. A bad MLM company that is still around and has been sued, reviewed, and regulated will have extremely negative reviews and publicity surrounding it. https://mofluid.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/04-clickfunnels-logo-1.png

I love love love this article! I’m a business growth coach who works with small business owners and often leaders from other MLM’s. From time to time I’ll get someone who has been struggling significantly even getting started and I find that it’s sheer absence of knowledge of the numbers. They are still under the impression that if I get three, and they get three then we’re all going to be millionaires. It’s very sad but the truth is not being told. Being in an MLM is hard. But it is very doable. I have had significant success in the past, while I am not in an MLM now. Nor do I want to be, you must be all In to make it work. Thank you for sharing this. I would love to interview you on one of my webinars
Webinars: Webinars are really powerful marketing tools. Like mini courses, webinars allow you to showcase your knowledge on a topic to your audience, with the difference that this is done as a live event—which allows your leads to have direct contact with you. As you might expect, webinars are considerably more time consuming than other tactics, but you can expect higher engagement and conversion rates from those who attend your live session.   
Not all MLM companies are created equal. Many see an initial burst of success followed by a gradual tapering off of profits, causing them to collapse and go out of business. MLM companies that succeed have sound business models, both for those who run the company and for those who sell product and recruit new sales agents. There are many sites devoted to MLM rankings, creating lists of companies likely to provide a return on investment to sales agents interested in the industry.

In March I joined an MLM company and I’m lost… my first reaction to network marketing was I’m not a sales person, to which I was told it’s not about sales but about building relationships. The other thing that makes me crazy is I see a lot of folks who appear so fake with their bubbly “everything is coming up roses and bubble gum” that I cringe. I’m honest to a fault and happy but not giddy. I feel like I have writers block in that I’m not sure what direction to take to get my business going, the struggle is real right now… Any thoughts or suggestions I can take away.
If 18,000,000 Americans consider MLM their careers, yet only 0.3% actually succeed beyond average corporate America wages, do people realize that means there are barely more than 50,000 Americans “living the MLM dream” and almost 17,950,000 who just help the 50,000? Sad. I was part of team Tupperware decades ago because I wanted to buy Tupperware for my home for less. It took me about 14 months as a stay at home mother (never recruited, never pressured, my distributor didn’t like my attitude) to accomplish that task and then walked away. I live in rural America where so many fall to MLMs attempting to climb out of paycheck to paycheck living (very few good jobs) like the saved into a baptismal pool. “Disciples” is the perfect word. MLMs are just not thriving here. How many Americans can one recruit/sell to for building a business in a rural county with less than 20,000 other Americans of which 75% live below the poverty line? I see MLM victims everywhere.
I learned seo and blogging, failed at that. I learned Facebook ads and email marketing, learned how to target the right demographics for Doterra, now people contact me wanting to know about the oils, then I got present and sign up, this my friend’s is the best of both worlds and what everyone should learn, find your form of marketing, go teach and sign up and leave for friends and family alone, unless you know they’ll want it.
If 18,000,000 Americans consider MLM their careers, yet only 0.3% actually succeed beyond average corporate America wages, do people realize that means there are barely more than 50,000 Americans “living the MLM dream” and almost 17,950,000 who just help the 50,000? Sad. I was part of team Tupperware decades ago because I wanted to buy Tupperware for my home for less. It took me about 14 months as a stay at home mother (never recruited, never pressured, my distributor didn’t like my attitude) to accomplish that task and then walked away. I live in rural America where so many fall to MLMs attempting to climb out of paycheck to paycheck living (very few good jobs) like the saved into a baptismal pool. “Disciples” is the perfect word. MLMs are just not thriving here. How many Americans can one recruit/sell to for building a business in a rural county with less than 20,000 other Americans of which 75% live below the poverty line? I see MLM victims everywhere. https://mk0sprout24comgnv2te.kinstacdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/clickfunnels-donations.png
At some point, a visitor becomes a potential customer when they consider whether the service or product offered is a match for their needs. This may happen during their first visit to your website or months later. We often get lost in conversions and forget about the number of returning visitors. Our content and its messaging should speak to consumers who may be on-the-fence or just doing research at the time and return later for their purchase. A single serving message that attempts to get the visitor to convert now is usually the case for the majority of websites content. We lose sight that not everyone will convert on the first visit. However, at this point in the online marketing funnel, we want to make our unique value proposition clear and provide information that the user needs to make the purchasing decision.
Nate is the CEO and Founder of NateLeung.com, a website dedicated to helping regular hard-working people to build wildly successful businesses they can be proud of and pass a legacy to their families. He is also the author of The Rise of the Digital Nomad: How to escape the 9 to 5 and earn a profitable income online. Step by step, Nate will show you how to build a business from scratch with the right strategies and systems in place so you can earn the income you know you deserve and have the kind of life you have always dreamed about.

The basics of the modern digital marketing funnel include four key stages (similar to AIDA): attract, nurture, convert and delight. However, to accommodate the many different kinds of marketing projects required to compete in today’s fierce online marketing battleground, the funnel steps have expanded. Numbers vary, but these 10 steps often comprise well-oiled digital marketing funnels. The first six stages take place before and up to the point of sale. The last four occur after the point of sale. Here’s a brief overview:
For example, let’s say your business has a blog and social media accounts it uses to get on a potential customer’s radar. From there, you encourage people to download an eBook in exchange for their email and drop them into an email drip that promotes an upcoming webinar. At the webinar, you sell people on your product or service, which convinces them to submit a lead form, work with your sales team and ultimately make a purchase. https://changecreator.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/null-26.png
The Federal Trade Commission warns "Not all multilevel marketing plans are legitimate. Some are pyramid schemes. It's best not to get involved in plans where the money you make is based primarily on the number of distributors you recruit and your sales to them, rather than on your sales to people outside the plan who intend to use the products."[21]
Network marketing companies, MLMs, and referral marketing companies that have been around longer are more trustworthy. Why is that? Government regulations on MLMS have increased in severity and frequency over the years. Companies that have survived such regulations will also have to have survived the threat of lawsuits, bad publicity, and negative feedback from unsatisfied distributors — not many companies would be able to survive this. A bad MLM company that is still around and has been sued, reviewed, and regulated will have extremely negative reviews and publicity surrounding it. https://mofluid.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/04-clickfunnels-logo-1.png
How to get started: If you want to do this at a conference, start by making sure that it’s ok with the organizers if you share content on your website with the people you are speaking to. Most of the times they will be ok with it and give you some pointers on what you can or can’t do, but for certain large conferences you might not be allowed to do this. To get people to visit your website, create content that is highly relevant to the topic of your talk and share it using a URL address that’s easy to write down or remember, as people will likely need to go back on their notes to visit your site. 
Hi Nate! wow great info! Being a total introvert and afraid to go towards people BUT am trying to find a way that people would be interested and come to me so I could talk to them about my work. I have no clue what to share on social medias to spike their curiosity. Been over the net for over a year trying to find a way to have people come to ME instead of me after them. Any suggestions? Bless you for your help!

Full funnel marketing is a comprehensive customer acquisition strategy that targets leads at each stage of the buyer’s journey. By creating content designed to help potential customers at each stage of the buyer’s journey, and targeting customers with content relevant to the stage they’re in (using different ad targeting methods) you can drastically increase revenue.


The Isreali immigrant brothers turned entrepreneurs behind Seacret Direct managed to take a cliche mall kiosk (you know, the ones that bother the crap out of you while you’re trying to shop) and turn it into a multi-million dollar global direct selling ccompany. Skincare products are pretty yawn-worthy nowadays, but Seacret’s dead sea products come with a 5,000 year history and a lot of fanfare. https://static1.squarespace.com/static/544c1964e4b0dd27d701dd68/t/5a5139cbe2c483af0be5937a/1537125138256/clickfunnels-pricing-how-it-works-1.png

I too was an MLM skeptic and additionally had no respect for the industry or those working in it. I stumbled across a company 6 years ago that had a product I LOVED (I didn’t know it was an MLM until after I was exposed to the product), I ended up joining for the discount. It was a low start up (under $100 with everything I needed for my biz and the products I got were worth about twice that), there are NO sales minimums or quotas, I don’t earn ANYTHING if someone signs under me unless I’m a team leader (which I am) and they two are earning (compensation from the company for my time spent as a TL, training and supporting, just like my team leader for at the old corporation I worked for)…we’re not required to have inventory, the only friends I sell to are people who were customers and then BECAME my friends, my hostesses earn a ton of free stuff for their hour of “work” (many of them are very thankful for the opportunity because they can’t otherwise afford the product which happens to be in the category of a “need” and not a want)…
The low cost often lures people in without doing their research. People make many mistakes when starting in MLM. Some don't research the company or product. Others don't read the contract they sign. Many newbies rely on the information provided by their sponsor. This is a problem because even the best sponsor won't be able to cover every little detail, and of course, some sponsors fail to disclose everything (in which case, you don't want that sponsor). Problems people experience in MLM due to failure to research or study the contract is their fault, not MLM.
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